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January 13

Charley Pride sang the national anthem prior to Super Bowl VIII at Rice Stadium in Houston, TX in 1974. The Miami Dolphins beat the Minnesota Vikings, 24-7.

Buck Owens married background vocalist Bonnie Campbell in 1948. At the time, she was four months pregnant with their son, Buddy Alan.

Kenny Chesney moved to Nashville from East Tennessee, setting up his future recording career in 1991.

Guitarist Tommy Crain died at home in Franklin, TN in 2011. During his 14-album run with The Charlie Daniels Band from 1975-1989, he co-wrote The Devil Went Down To Georgia, In America and Boogie Woogie Fiddle Country Blues.

RECORDINGS ON JANUARY 13th

1965: Eddy Arnold recorded What’s He Doing In My World at RCA Studio B in Nashville

1968: Johnny Cash recorded the live album Johnny Cash At Folsom Prison in California, remaking Folsom Prison Blues in the process. Cash employs his usual entourage, including June Carter, The Carter Family, Carl Perkins and The Statler Brothers

1970: Bill Anderson & Jan Howard recorded Someday We’ll Be Together during the evening at Bradley’s Barn in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee. That same day, seven years before they’d become a country act, gospel group The Oak Ridge Boys recorded the Jerry Reed song Talk About The Good Times, a future Grammy nominee, at the Jack Clement Studios in Nashville

1978: Dolly Parton recorded Two Doors Down at Sound Labs in Hollywood

1982: Ronnie Milsap recorded He Got You at Groundstar Laboratory in Nashville

1986: The Bellamy Brothers recorded Kids Of The Baby Boom

1994: Patty Loveless recorded You Don’t Even Know Who I Am at Nashville’s Woodland Sound Studio

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Guitarist Bernice Hilburn was born in Black Rock, AR in 1927. She and husband Doyle Turner played in Hank Williams’ band for nearly two years in the ’40s. Their son, steel guitarist Robby Turner, plays on hits by Travis Tritt, Gary Allan and Chely Wright.

Trace Adkins was born in Springhill, LA in 1962. The deep-voiced, 6′-6″ singer earns the Academy of Country Music’s Top New Male award, joins the Grand Ole Opry and broadens his audience with a stint on “The Celebrity Apprentice”